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How to assemble spring rolls

1. Place filling in middle of the wrap and brush all edges with a bit of water.
2-4. Pick up the corner of wrap closest to you, fold over filling, and tuck in.
5-6. Fold over left side and right side of wrap tightly.
7. Roll up spring roll; make sure it’s relatively tight.
8. Your spring roll is ready to be fried!
 
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Chicken tikka spice mix recipe

Featured in this weeks’ Original and Inspiration Menus is the Chicken tikka masala with fresh coriander and poppadums. For our customers we provide a handy recipe sachet, but if you’re wanting to recreate this stunning dish, here’s the spice mix recipe!
To take this meal to the next level, I would highly recommend toasting whole coriander seeds and cumin seeds, then grinding them down with a pestle and mortar. Toasting your own spices honestly makes your dishes extra flavourful!

Serves 4 (enough for 600g chicken breast or tenders):
4 tsp ground turmeric
2 tsp garam masala
2 tsp ground coriander
2 tsp ground cumin
Combine spices in a bowl and store in an airtight container – it will keep for several months – so why not make a double batch to have on hand.
Below is the recipe in full, for those of you who missed out.
For the spice paste:
4 cloves garlic, crushed
4 tsp ginger, grated
3 tbsp chicken tikka spice mix
3 tbsp rice bran oil

For the chicken:
600 g chicken breast, sliced
4 tbsp natural yoghurt
½ tsp salt

For the tikka:
4 tbsp butter
1 brown onion, sliced
4 tbsp tomato paste
½-1 tsp chilli flakes, or to taste
2 cartons coconut cream
2 tins chickpeas, drained
6 tbsp coriander, chopped

To serve:
16 poppadums
Rice bran oil for frying
2 heads fancy lettuce, wedged

Prepare in advance: For best results, marinate the chicken in the fridge for 4-6 hours or overnight. 
Pre-heat the grill.
Prepare the aromatics first. Peel and crush the garlic, peel and grate the ginger, peel and finely slice the onion top to bottom into petal shapes and keep separate.
To make the spice paste, combine garlic, ginger, half the spice mix and oil in a small bowl. To marinate the chicken, combine yogurt with salt and half of the spice paste in a separate bowl. Slice the chicken lengthways into 2-3 cm long strips and add to the yoghurt marinade, coat in the mixture and set aside.
For the tikka, heat butter in a large heavy-based pan over a medium heat. Add the sliced onion and cook gently for 8-10 minutes until slightly browned and caramelised. Add the tomato paste and cook stirring continuously for a minute until tomato paste releases its sugars and oil, causing it to darken. Add remainder of the spice paste (not used for the chicken marinade) and the chilli flakes and cook gently for 2-3 minutes until fragrant.
Roughly chop the coriander leaves and stalks. Add coconut cream, chickpeas and coriander to the pan, reserving some coriander for garnish, and simmer gently, stirring occasionally for 8-10 minutes until sauce thickens.
Place the marinated chicken in a single layer on an oven rack with an oven tray underneath to catch the juices. Pop under the grill and cook for 10-12 minutes, turning once. By the end the chicken should be cooked through and a little browned.
For the poppadum, heat 1-2 cm oil in a small frying pan and cook poppadum for 4-5 seconds, one at a time until puffed up. Drain vertically on paper towel before serving.
To serve, cut the lettuce into wedges and place onto plates. Spoon the sauce onto the plate next to the lettuce. Place the chicken on the sauce and garnish with remaining fresh coriander. Serve the poppadum on a side plate.

 
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Pytt i panna with leftover Christmas meat

  Ever find yourself staring at the leftovers piled high in your fridge after a Christmas get-together? Well, don’t worry, we are here to help you avoid food waste! Instead of shoving everything into the freezer before you drive off to the beach, why not try to clear your fridge as much as possible and bring the food with you to the bach in a chilly bin? Leftovers are so good for making quick picnic lunches, or something light and easy for dinner. In Sweden, we have a dish called pytt i panna – a beef and potato hash. It’s a very versatile recipe, so you can substitute the beef with other types of meats.   Serves 4

For the beetroot:

1 tbsp white wine vinegar; 400g beetroot

For the pytt:

2 tbsp rice bran oil; 800g potatoes, diced; 2 carrots, diced; 1 brown onion, diced; 300g leftover meat, diced;

For the eggs:

4 eggs; Rice bran oil for frying; Salt and pepper to taste;

Method:

Heat the oven to 200°C. Peel and slice the beetroot. Bring a small pot of water to a rolling boil and add the beetroot slices and vinegar. Simmer, partially covered, for 25-30 minutes, then remove from the heat and drain. Set aside until serving. While the beetroot is cooking, start preparing the rest of the meal. Scrub and dice potatoes and carrot into ½-1 cm pieces. Bring a large pot with water to the boil. Add the potatoes and carrots to the boiling water and parboil for 5-6 minutes. Meanwhile dice the beef and onion into ½ – 1 cm cubes. Drain the potatoes and carrots and place back over a low heat to steam out excess moisture. Place beef, carrots, potatoes and onion in a large oven tray, drizzle with the oil and bake for 20-25 minutes until the veges start to crisp up to a golden brown colour. Towards the end of the baking time, heat a frying pan over a medium-high heat with some oil and crack in the eggs. Fry how you like, sunny side up or easy over. Foodie fact: In Sweden this dish is traditionally served with a raw egg yolk cracked on top of the hot plate of food, so give this a go if you’re brave. However, it’s now more common to serve with a fried egg on top, which is how I prefer it! To serve, mound the beef and potato hash onto a plate. Top with egg and serve beetroot on the side. Sprinkle with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper at the table.